Wednesday, July 29, 2009


I was recently given an Accu-Chek Nano meter to try out as well as its software. I am old school. I like to see things written down in front of me. Computers crash. I lose files. I want hard data! I have to admit however that the logging break we have taken this summer and just looking at numbers in time frames on a screen does have a certain appeal.

I have had problems getting into the information at times. The set up process seemed to take years. Once I was in, the graphs were easy to read and adding information was a piece of cake. The downside is that I don't have that information from the piece of cake he may have eaten. There is room but if I had it written down....well I might as well have used a paper log!

This sent me back to thinking about one of our old One Touch meters. It had everything...carbs, insulin, readings, exercise, the works. It is a bit large but there is a lot of data to be input. I was thinking that perhaps we should look at going back to it. This means that I would have to find the meter, the software, and the cables. The Nano has a nice infrared port. Life is simple.

Another problem for us is that we use a variety of meters. We have a separate program for the pump (which I rarely download and really should do this soon!) . I am thinking that one type of meter and seriously thinking about software could be a good idea for Liam. The problem is I like so many features of a variety of meters! As I said the One Touch with all of the bells and whistles is great but no backlight. The One Touch UltraMinis are great because they are so small but you can't add data to them (pre meal, post meal). The FreeStyle Lite has no coding. Love that! The nano is easy to read and has some cool options.

I just need one meter that can satisfy all of my desires...oh and add in a good CGMS too please and I will never need to see a piece of paper and kill another tree again!

Monday, July 20, 2009

Heartfelt condolences

I sit here stunned and my heart breaking. I received an email telling me that the man who saved my son's life over nine years ago has just lost his own son. A young man just 24 years old. I can only begin to imagine the numbness and the pain. Life is so incredibly short. We strive to do as much as we can each day and pray that we make a small bit of difference.

My heart goes out to the family. They remain in our thoughts and prayers. I have no idea of what happened to this young man and it makes no difference. His life on this earth has ended and he will undoubtedly leave behind and incredible empty space.

Our deepest, deepest sympathies to a family who has given us so much in allowing us to have such an incredible doctor as a huge part of our lives.

Friday, July 10, 2009

Pizza really is evil

People always discuss the evils of pizza. When we were on NPH years ago we didn't have that problem....well until his honeymoon ended and then I began to see issues where previously there had been none. I still thought I had pizza pretty well handled. We used an extended bolus and life seemed good...except when in New York and dealing with their pizza. There just seemed to be no bolusing for it.

Well its been years and now I am having a new "pizza" problem. We use the extended bolus with great success for the first four or more hours. Readings are in range. I am a happy camper. Liam is a happy camper. Life is great! Then we hit the 8 hour or so after pizza mark and things begin to get ugly. Eight hours! Who would think!!! Last night he was 6 (108) four hours after pizza. I thought we had things beat. By 10 pm (we ate the pizza for lunch at around 1pm or so) he was up to 24(432). I couldn't believe it. It wasn't the other food that he had eaten because that was pretty normal and I am sure the bolus was accurate. By 1am he was down to 21 (378) but this just seemed crazy. I really hate diabetes. A lovely family lunch turned into a Mom meltdown by 2am. Ah the joys!

Monday, July 6, 2009

Once upon a time....

Once upon a time in a not so far away place, there was a little boy who was beginning his school career. He looked like any other child of his age. There was one glaring difference however. He was one of approximately one thousand very special children that lived in this land. They were children living with Type 1 diabetes.

This young man was blessed to be beginning his academic career in a loving school in this place not so far away. He went to an enchanted school that made sure he was safe. They kept in contact with his mother and ensured that all of his care was diligently looked after. He truly was a part of their magical family. This became more evident one spring six long years ago.

The staff began organizing year end activities. One of the incredible wizards of learning at this enchanted school went to the child's mother and asked if the school would be able to do its own walk for diabetes. The money would go to charity and the children would get to know how they were helping one of their own special friends. Tears came to the mother's eyes as she said of course this could be done.

Six years had passed and the enchanted school filled with wizards and amazing children continued to raise money for people living with diabetes. Each year the event grew. Each year more and more money was raised. The enthusiasm for this event never wavered. As the years passed the magical place of learning which housed less than 55 students from kindergarten to grade eight amassed a total of close to $18,000 for diabetes charities. What a truly magical place that could foster such a loving and caring environment. What an incredible place not so far away that could raise such large amounts of money in an economy that was in the grips of the evil Recession. If only such a place could exist! What a role model it would be!

But that enchanted school in a place not so faraway does exist and their story is real! Ecole Notre Dame du Cap is a French language school in the town of Cape St. George in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. On June 15, 2009 it raised $2217.20 for the Diabetes Hope Foundation. This foundation, with the help of these incredible young people, does what the provincial government has not yet been able to do--they provide assistance for young adults to purchase diabetes supplies that cannot afford to do so on their own.

These incredible students consistently raise money to help their friend and those living with diabetes in this province. They enjoy a day made extra special by pizzas provided by the school's Parent Committee, prizes provided by a variety of sponsors, and the sunshine Mother Nature never seems to let them be without on their special day.

As the mother of that very special child whose life was nearly taken by Type 1 diabetes over nine years ago, I continue to be amazed at the generosity of the children, the staff, and the community. They reduce me to tears each year to know and see how much they care for my child and others living with this silent killer. Thank you again to the students. Thank you to the staff. Thank you to the sponsors who allow me to give a small token of thanks back to each student. And thank you to the community of Bay St. George who continue to support our children as they raise money for this event each year.